Many mechanics probably have the MAC Tools BWP151 in their tool arsenal, and rightly so. This is a very powerful impact gun, and it shows. In the end, the MAC BWP151 finished with 81.4 points in our shootout. In the power category, it and the DeWALT finished neck and neck, in 3rd and 4th place, so it delivers plenty of power. The MAC Tools impact should have done much better in our speed (repetitive power) testing, but it seemed to have a fraction of a second longer lag, from the time you pull the trigger until the gun starts.


The Tradespro 837212 is a great device for anyone who needs to make an investment in a powerful tool on a limited budget. In fact, we consider it to be one of the best investments you could make. The device is fairly light weight which allows you to put in consistent work without tiring out too quickly or getting fatigued. You’ll love the comfortable grip as well which helps you to keep a steady hand on the device while you’re working. Additionally, the device can generate an impressive amount of torque and is on record for producing up to 240 ft-lbs of torque.
When it comes to the Makita XWT08, you can’t go wrong with this purchase. While it finished sixth with 78.7 points, only nine points separated 2nd to 6th. If you are Makita fan, then you’ll be proud to own the XWT08 as well. Power is ample, and it finished 2nd in real-world testing, with the repetitive power (speed) I-beam test, running off all 10 nuts in just 12.6 seconds.
Original NAPA sales receipt(s) or sales invoice(s) dated between 10/01/2015 and 12/31/2015.Photo copies will not be accepted (except for RI residents). It is recommended that you make a photo copy of all submitted materials for your records. Note: To resolve any potential questions or issues regarding your submission, you may be required to mail or fax these copies.
Compressed air is the most common power source for impact wrenches, providing a low-cost design with the best power-to-weight ratio. A simple vane motor is almost always used, usually with four to seven vanes, and various lubrication systems, the most common of which uses oiled air, while others may include special oil passages routed to the parts that need it and a separate, sealed oil system for the hammer assembly. Most impact wrenches drive the hammer directly from the motor, giving it fast action when the fastener requires only low torque. Other designs use a gear reduction system before the hammer mechanism, most often a single-stage planetary gearset usually with a heavier hammer, delivering a more constant speed and higher "spin" torque. Electric impact wrenches are available, either mains powered, or for automotive use, 12-volt, 18-volt or 24-volt DC-powered. Recently, cordless electric impact wrenches have become common, although typically their power outputs are significantly lower than corded electric or air-powered equivalents. Some industrial tools are hydraulically powered, using high-speed hydraulic motors, and are used in some heavy equipment repair shops, large construction sites, and other areas where a suitable hydraulic supply is available. Hydraulic impact wrenches have the advantage of high power-to-weight ratio.
When a nut or a bolt head is in a recess below the surface of a bolted member, a socket wrench must be used; this is essentially a short pipe with a square or hexagonal hole and either an integral or a removable handle. Modern socket wrenches are made in sets, consisting of a number of short sockets with a square hole in one end that fits a removable handle and 8- or 12-point holes in the other end to fit various bolt and nut sizes. There are several types of handles and extensions, such as a T handle, screwdriver-grip handle, and a ratchet handle (see ratchet).
You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.
The Tradespro 837212 is a great device for anyone who needs to make an investment in a powerful tool on a limited budget. In fact, we consider it to be one of the best investments you could make. The device is fairly light weight which allows you to put in consistent work without tiring out too quickly or getting fatigued. You’ll love the comfortable grip as well which helps you to keep a steady hand on the device while you’re working. Additionally, the device can generate an impressive amount of torque and is on record for producing up to 240 ft-lbs of torque.
There are a lot of great wrench designs on the market, but in our opinion, one of the top designs would have to go to the Ingersoll Rand W7150. The Ingersoll design allows you to get the job done quickly and efficiently thanks to all of the great features that were built into the model. Additionally, it is powered by a powerful motor and is lightweight – perfect qualities for any worker who needs an impact wrench that can be mobile.
We love the DEWALT DCF880HM2 for its simple yet easy to use design and ability to make work easier. It comes with an impressive energy efficiency system that allows you to have 33% more charge than other standard battery packs are capable of attaining. This translates into about 24 hours of work time that you’ll be able to use before the batteries need to be recharged again. You’ll also be able to take advantage of the hog ring anvil incorporated into the design. It makes it easier to do socket changes and get on to other work.

crow's-foot wrench	crow's foot	A type of wrench designed to use the same drive sizes as socket wrenches, but non-cylindrical in shape. The ends are the same as those found on the open-end, box-end, or the flare-nut wrenches. These wrenches are used when torque must be measured, or when the application precludes the use of a regular socket or wrench. Also used in place of conventional open/box wrenches where the wrenches are large, usually at a lower cost, or for when space and weight restrictions are critical.	socket

wrench The most common type of adjustable wrench in use today. The adjustable end wrench differs from the monkey wrench in that the gripping faces of the jaws are displaced to a (typically) 15 degree angle relative to the tool's handle, a design feature that facilitates the wrench's use in close quarters. The modern adjustable end wrench was invented by Johan Petter Johansson [4]of Bahco. The common use of "Crescent wrench" to describe this design is derived from the Crescent brand, owned by Apex Brands, Inc. Apex Tool Group, LLC. adjustable
As the output of an impact wrench, when hammering, is a very short impact force, the actual effective torque is difficult to measure, with several different ratings in use. As the tool delivers a fixed amount of energy with each blow, rather than a fixed torque, the actual output torque changes with the duration of the output pulse. If the output is springy or capable of absorbing energy, the impulse will simply be absorbed, and virtually no torque will ever be applied, and somewhat counter-intuitively, if the object is very springy, the wrench may actually turn backwards as the energy is delivered back to the anvil, while it is not connected to the hammer and able to spin freely.[citation needed] A wrench that is capable of freeing a rusted nut on a very large bolt may be incapable of turning a small screw mounted on a spring. "Maximum torque" is the number most often given by manufacturers, which is the instantaneous peak torque delivered if the anvil is locked into a perfectly solid object. "Working torque" is a more realistic number for continually driving a very stiff fastener. "Nut-busting torque" is often quoted, with the usual definition being that the wrench can loosen a nut tightened with the specified amount of torque in some specified time period. Accurately controlling the output torque of an impact wrench is very difficult, and even an experienced operator will have a hard time making sure a fastener is not under-tightened or over-tightened using an impact wrench. Special socket extensions are available, which take advantage of the inability of an impact wrench to work against a spring, to precisely limit the output torque. Designed with spring steel, they act as large torsion springs, flexing at their torque rating, and preventing any further torque from being applied to the fastener. Some impact wrenches designed for product assembly have a built-in torque control system, such as a built-in torsion spring and a mechanism that shuts the tool down when the given torque is exceeded. When very precise torque is required, an impact wrench is only used to snug down the fastener, with a torque wrench used for the final tightening. Due to the lack of standards when measuring the maximum torque, some manufacturers are believed to inflate their ratings, or to use measurements with little bearing on how the tool will perform in actual use.[citation needed] Many air impact wrenches incorporate a flow regulator into their design, either as a separate control or part of the reversing valve, allowing torque to be roughly limited in one or both directions, while electric tools may use a variable speed trigger for the same effect.
×