crow's-foot wrench crow's foot A type of wrench designed to use the same drive sizes as socket wrenches, but non-cylindrical in shape. The ends are the same as those found on the open-end, box-end, or the flare-nut wrenches. These wrenches are used when torque must be measured, or when the application precludes the use of a regular socket or wrench. Also used in place of conventional open/box wrenches where the wrenches are large, usually at a lower cost, or for when space and weight restrictions are critical. socket
As one of the few subjective areas of our testing, we do our best to still quantify our results by including many users and data logging the results. Even though cordless tools are getting a bit smaller and lighter, due to technology, the cordless impact wrenches still have some weight and girth. Using a heavy tool can be a real pain, so it makes sense to place value on the fit and comfort of such a tool. More than just weight, balance, and vibration also play into our testing.
I`m an old fart that started wrenchin when replacing plugs and points was mandtory every 6 months or so. The introduction of battery powered impacts did not impress me at first but the stuff Milwaukee makes is unreal. They now have a big boy I`ve heard twist an unreal 1100 ft lbs!! All there stuff is great, and one battery and “one key” (for tracking) is like si-fi stuff to this old fart. I cant wait till they come out with a 18volt jack with built in jack stand.

Across the board, the Bosch HTH181 wins for being the most ergonomic, and this was almost unanimous from our users. Milwaukee’s Gen2 (2767) and Ingersoll Rand’s W7150 tied for second in ergonomics. The Ingersoll Rand is also the lightest of the bunch, weighing just 6.88 pounds with the 5.0 Ah battery. Bosch and DeWALT followed in a close 2nd and 3rd, at only 7.04 and 7.10 pounds, respectively. The heaviest tool in the batch is the Matco Tools at 8.02 pounds, with the 4.0 Ah battery.
One issue noticed by a couple of the testers was the placement of the reversing switch. The switch seems to be right in the path of your trigger finger. Sometimes, when trying to go fast, the forefinger would push the switch into the neutral/locked position. This didn’t happen all the time, and it seemed to only be noticeable to those with larger hands.
Our Torque Wrenches offer a dependable fast and Our Torque Wrenches offer a dependable fast and accurate way to tighten fasteners in automotive agricultural and commercial/industrial applications. Reversible ratcheting heads make work easier in tight spaces and an audible signal lets you know your target torque has been reached. A slide-back adjustment collar design and large laser-etched markings ...  More + Product Details Close
I`m an old fart that started wrenchin when replacing plugs and points was mandtory every 6 months or so. The introduction of battery powered impacts did not impress me at first but the stuff Milwaukee makes is unreal. They now have a big boy I`ve heard twist an unreal 1100 ft lbs!! All there stuff is great, and one battery and “one key” (for tracking) is like si-fi stuff to this old fart. I cant wait till they come out with a 18volt jack with built in jack stand.

Many mechanics probably have the MAC Tools BWP151 in their tool arsenal, and rightly so. This is a very powerful impact gun, and it shows. In the end, the MAC BWP151 finished with 81.4 points in our shootout. In the power category, it and the DeWALT finished neck and neck, in 3rd and 4th place, so it delivers plenty of power. The MAC Tools impact should have done much better in our speed (repetitive power) testing, but it seemed to have a fraction of a second longer lag, from the time you pull the trigger until the gun starts.
Compressed air is the most common power source for impact wrenches, providing a low-cost design with the best power-to-weight ratio. A simple vane motor is almost always used, usually with four to seven vanes, and various lubrication systems, the most common of which uses oiled air, while others may include special oil passages routed to the parts that need it and a separate, sealed oil system for the hammer assembly. Most impact wrenches drive the hammer directly from the motor, giving it fast action when the fastener requires only low torque. Other designs use a gear reduction system before the hammer mechanism, most often a single-stage planetary gearset usually with a heavier hammer, delivering a more constant speed and higher "spin" torque. Electric impact wrenches are available, either mains powered, or for automotive use, 12-volt, 18-volt or 24-volt DC-powered. Recently, cordless electric impact wrenches have become common, although typically their power outputs are significantly lower than corded electric or air-powered equivalents. Some industrial tools are hydraulically powered, using high-speed hydraulic motors, and are used in some heavy equipment repair shops, large construction sites, and other areas where a suitable hydraulic supply is available. Hydraulic impact wrenches have the advantage of high power-to-weight ratio.
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