DeWalt’s 20-volt 880 Lithium-Ion cordless impact is a 1/2-inch drive job with a whopping 400 foot-pounds of torque rating. This tool has a variable-speed trigger with an electric brake; an ergonomic handle provides added control and comfort. It even includes an LED light with 20-second delay, providing greater visibility when working in dark areas. See the Summit Racing catalog for more info. (Image/Summit Racing)

One of the features on the Milwaukee 2767 that stood out is the “Bolt Removal” mode. This was not found on any other impact wrench we tested. On the push-button speed selection at the base of the impact, you can select 1-3. Setting 1 is the slowest and 3, the fastest. The fourth selection is the “Bolt Removal” mode, indicated by a circular arrow designation. When this mode is selected, the user holds their finger on the trigger—once the fastener breaks loose, the Milwaukee senses this and slows the RPM to just 750 to finish removing the nut. This keeps the nut from flying across the shop.


The Bosch IWH181-01 is great for contractors that need a sturdy device capable of getting the job done. The set is equipped with everything you need to take on heavy duty projects that require some serious torque to unlodge stubborn nuts and bolts. The device has an impressive design that helps to make work an easier and more efficient task that you can look forward to. No longer will you have to dread the tedious work of unscrewing difficult bolts. Instead, you’ll be able to work longer and smarter with the built in LED lights and lighter weight. It’s a great tool that will keep up with you and is built to last - definitely one of the best investments you can make.
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 Tim Johnson Having a love of automobiles that stems from his father's racing days, Tim has spent a lifetime around cars and trucks. From restoring and renovating them as well as fixing them when they break, Tim always has a tool handy. He currently resides in central Florida with his wife and 5 kids where he divides his time as mentor, devoted father, loving husband and jungle gym.

Author: Wayne Scraba Wayne Scraba is a diehard car guy and regular contributor to OnAllCylinders. He’s owned his own speed shop, built race cars, street rods, and custom motorcycles, and restored muscle cars. He’s authored five how-to books and written over 4,500 tech articles that have appeared in sixty different high performance automotive, motorcycle and aviation magazines worldwide.
Many mechanics probably have the MAC Tools BWP151 in their tool arsenal, and rightly so. This is a very powerful impact gun, and it shows. In the end, the MAC BWP151 finished with 81.4 points in our shootout. In the power category, it and the DeWALT finished neck and neck, in 3rd and 4th place, so it delivers plenty of power. The MAC Tools impact should have done much better in our speed (repetitive power) testing, but it seemed to have a fraction of a second longer lag, from the time you pull the trigger until the gun starts.
Grip – Impact wrenches can actually come in a few shapes and sizes, but in this guide we’ve concentrated on models that – if you squint – look like standard power drills. We’ve done this as most cordless style impact wrenches are of this type. They are also simple to use. Because of their shape they do need a good grip, so make sure you bear that in mind. A good grip should be ergonomic, so it’s comfortable to hold, with good trigger placement and a raised or rubberized surface so you can orient the tool in your hand by touch only.
Various methods are used to attach the socket or accessory to the anvil, such as a spring-loaded pin that snaps into a matching hole in the socket, preventing the socket being removed until an object is used to depress the pin, a hog ring which holds the socket by friction or by snapping into indents machined into the socket, and a through-hole, where a pin is inserted completely through the socket and anvil, locking the socket on. Hog rings are used on most smaller tools, with through-hole used only on larger impact wrenches, typically ¾" drive or greater. Pin retainers used to be more common, but seem to be being replaced by hog rings on most tools, despite the lack of a positive lock. ¼" female hex drive is becoming increasingly popular for small impact wrenches, especially cordless electric versions, allowing them to fit standard screwdriver tips rather than sockets.
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