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Torque Wrenches. A torque wrench allows you to apply a precise measure of force, or torque, to a bolt. Use these wrenches when you need to tighten bolts an exact amount, such as in engine repair. Some models have a scale that indicates the torque. Others create a clicking sound when the desired torque is reached. You can also find options with digital readouts for extra precision. 

Box-end wrenches have ends that enclose the nut and have 6, 8, 12, or 16 points inside the head. A wrench with 12 points is used on either a hexagonal or a square nut; the 8- and 16-point wrenches are used on square members. Because the sides of the box are thin, these wrenches are suitable for turning nuts that are hard to reach with an open-end wrench.
A wrench from Grainger comes in many styles and configurations to meet your job requirements. Made of durable steel, these wrenches can handle any metalworking, plumbing, or electrical job. A combination wrench applies plenty of torque to tackle any tightening challenge, and is available individually or in sets. An adjustable wrench can conform to multisized nuts and bolts, and has a jaw capacity of up to 1+ inches. A light and portable hex key loosens and tightens hexagonal bolts and screws with ease, perfect for highly specialized machinery. Look to Grainger for any of the wrenches your industrial job might need.
Sockets and extensions for impact wrenches are made of high tensile metal, as any spring effect will greatly reduce the torque available at the fastener. Even so, the use of multiple extensions, universal joints, and so forth will weaken the impacts, and the operator needs to minimize their use. Using non-impact sockets or accessories with an impact wrench will often result in bending, fracturing, or otherwise damaging the accessory, as most are not capable of withstanding the sudden high torque of an impact tool, and can result in stripping the head on the fastener. Non-impact sockets and accessories are made of a harder more brittle metal. Safety glasses should always be worn when working with impact tools, as the strong impacts can generate high-speed shrapnel if a socket, accessory, or fastener fails.
A common hammer design has the hammer able to slide and rotate on a shaft, with a spring holding it in the downwards position. Between the hammer and the driving shaft is a steel ball on a ramp, such that if the input shaft rotates ahead of the hammer with enough torque, the spring is compressed and the hammer is slid backwards. On the bottom of the hammer, and the top of the anvil, are dog teeth, designed for high impacts. When the tool is used, the hammer rotates until its dog teeth contact the teeth on the anvil, stopping the hammer from rotating. The input shaft continues to turn, causing the ramp to lift the steel ball, lifting the hammer assembly until the dog teeth no longer engage the anvil, and the hammer is free to spin again. The hammer then springs forward to the bottom of the ball ramp, and is accelerated by the input shaft, until the dog teeth contact the anvil again, delivering the impact. The process then repeats, delivering blows every time the teeth meet, almost always twice per revolution. If the output has little load on it, such as when spinning a loose nut on a bolt, the torque will never be high enough to cause the ball to compress the spring, and the input will smoothly drive the output. This design has the advantage of small size and simplicity, but energy is wasted moving the entire hammer back and forth, and delivering multiple blows per revolution gives less time for the hammer to accelerate. This design is often seen after a gear reduction, compensating for the lack of acceleration time by delivering more torque at a lower speed.
Torque Wrenches. A torque wrench allows you to apply a precise measure of force, or torque, to a bolt. Use these wrenches when you need to tighten bolts an exact amount, such as in engine repair. Some models have a scale that indicates the torque. Others create a clicking sound when the desired torque is reached. You can also find options with digital readouts for extra precision. 
L wrench Allen key A wrench used to turn screw or bolt heads designed with a hexagonal socket (recess) to receive the wrench. The wrenches come in two common forms: L-shaped and T-handles. The L-shaped wrenches are formed from hexagonal wire stock, while the T-handles are the same hex wire stock with a metal or plastic handle attached to the end. There are also indexable-driver-bits that can be used in indexable screwdrivers. keys
Open-end and Flat Wrenches. The most basic type of wrench, open-end and flat wrenches have open jaws that slip onto nuts and bolts. Because they can be slim and short, these wrenches are especially useful in tight spaces. They’re not adjustable, so they’re sold in wrench sets of all sizes. They’re available in both SAE sizes, which are expressed in fractions of an inch, and in metric sizes. 
Let the battle begin! Impacts galore. Full #shootout on the site soon. This is the new @milwaukeetool 1/2" high torque impact model 2767 starting things off for us, on one of our tests. These are 10 x 7/8" grade 8 hardened bolts, torqued to 500 ft-lbs. Stay tuned. . . . . . #tools #impact #cordless #mechanic #shop #shoplife #carsofinstagram #hotrod #toolsofthetrade #garagelife #garage #nbhd #NothingButHeavyDuty #milwaukeetool
Just because you have the most powerful cordless impact wrench, it doesn’t mean it will last forever. While it doesn’t guarantee longevity or durability, it is nice to know that tool companies stand behind their tools. The New Milwaukee M18 FUEL Impact Wrench secures the top spot including warranties with 5-years of coverage on both of their high-torque impacts (2763 and 2767). Four manufacturers include 3-year warranties: DeWalt, Ingersoll Rand, MAC, and Makita. Matco Tools is the bottom-dweller here with just an 18-month warranty, according to their customer support center.
The hammer mechanism in an impact wrench needs to allow the hammer to spin freely, impact the anvil, then release and spin freely again. Many designs are used to accomplish this task, all with some drawbacks. Depending on the design, the hammer may drive the anvil either once or twice per revolution (where a revolution is the difference between the hammer and the anvil), with some designs delivering faster, weaker blows twice per revolution, or slower, more powerful ones only once per revolution.
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