When it comes to specific jobs, you can find wrenches to help you complete them. Torque wrenches, strap wrenches and pipe wrenches let you get the perfect amount of force without overtightening. Without the right wrench for the job, you risk stripping the bolts and damaging your work in progress. Ratcheting wrenches are perfect for getting jobs done quickly. Many will often feature a standard crescent wrench end in combination with the ratchet, effectively doubling the number of wrenches you have.

The Milwaukee 2763-22 M18 is one of the best designs on the market today in terms of powerful and capable tools, which is why it made our cut for premium choice. The device is capable of generating an impressive 700 ft-lbs of maximum fastening torque and up to 1100 ft-lbs of nut busting torque. It makes innovative design and simplicity merge in a beautiful combination with the thoughtfulness put forth by the manufacturers and helps to make socket changes easier with its ½ inch anvil.
Cordless impact wrenches come in two body styles: inline and pistol-grip. The inline style of impact wrench looks a lot like a large screwdriver, with a grip behind the hammer and anvil. The pistol style is shaped like a handgun, and the grip rests underneath the motor. Cordless impact wrenches also feature a selection of socket sizes designed to fit nuts and bolts of different sizes. The following table shows what socket sizes work with each impact wrench shape. Inline wrenches work best for jobs where you’re working in tight spaces and simply can’t fit a pistol-type impact wrench. If you plan to work on machinery, especially cars, then an inline impact wrench is a must-have tool.
And its steel lined casing will help to protect it from any workplace mishaps that could occur. Additionally, you’ll definitely appreciate the 780 ft-lbs of reverse torque that the machine is capable of generating, as well as the 1100 ft-lbs of nut busting power that it can produce. This product is truly innovative and produces amazing power, making it the highest quality on the market and sealing its place in our list as top choice
Grip – Impact wrenches can actually come in a few shapes and sizes, but in this guide we’ve concentrated on models that – if you squint – look like standard power drills. We’ve done this as most cordless style impact wrenches are of this type. They are also simple to use. Because of their shape they do need a good grip, so make sure you bear that in mind. A good grip should be ergonomic, so it’s comfortable to hold, with good trigger placement and a raised or rubberized surface so you can orient the tool in your hand by touch only.
Leading the pack in driving the weight up the scale is the Milwaukee 2767 (Gen 2) cordless impact wrench. While all the others can’t max the scale with 50-pounds atop, the 2767 can. In fact, we had to add 10 more pounds, a total of 60, and the Milwaukee 2767 still drove it the majority of the way. DeWALT and the Ingersoll Rand followed a pretty close second at 94% and 92% of the Milwaukee in the power category.
Sockets and extensions for impact wrenches are made of high tensile metal, as any spring effect will greatly reduce the torque available at the fastener. Even so, the use of multiple extensions, universal joints, and so forth will weaken the impacts, and the operator needs to minimize their use. Using non-impact sockets or accessories with an impact wrench will often result in bending, fracturing, or otherwise damaging the accessory, as most are not capable of withstanding the sudden high torque of an impact tool, and can result in stripping the head on the fastener. Non-impact sockets and accessories are made of a harder more brittle metal. Safety glasses should always be worn when working with impact tools, as the strong impacts can generate high-speed shrapnel if a socket, accessory, or fastener fails.
The Ryobi P261 is a great tool for contractors and one of the best investments you could choose to make. It comes with a three speed system that helps to get the motor going and is capable of reaching speeds of up to 3,200 impacts per minute. The Ryobi P261 also comes with a square anvil system that allows you to make sure you’re able to make secure socket connections for safer, more efficient, and more accurate work. Thanks to the LED lighting system that is built into the device, you’ll also be able to work late into the night hours or in less than desireable lighting conditions while maintaining full visual accuracy of the task at hand.
Another common design uses a hammer fixed directly onto the input shaft, with a pair of pins acting as clutches. When the hammer rotates past the anvil, a ball ramp pushes the pins outwards against a spring, extending them to where they will hit the anvil and deliver the impact, then release and spring back into the hammer, usually by having the balls "fall off" the other side of the ramp at the instant the hammer hits. Since the ramp need only have one peak around the shaft, and the engagement of the hammer with the anvil is not based on a number of teeth between them, this design allows the hammer to accelerate for a full revolution before contacting the anvil, giving it more time to accelerate and delivering a stronger impact. The disadvantages are that the sliding pins must handle very high impacts, and often cause the early failure of tool.
For more than 100 years, professionals have relied on Ingersoll Rand for quality and performance on the toughest jobs. Our advanced engineering and manufacturing have a standard of excellence often copied, but never matched. When it comes to assembly tools, industrial tools, cordless tools and vehicle service tools, don't settle for less. Count on genuine Ingersoll Rand tools, accessories, and equipment.

Power or impact wrenches are used for tightening or loosening nuts quickly. They are essentially small handheld electric or pneumatic motors that can rotate socket wrenches at high speed. They are equipped with a torque-limiting device that will stop the rotation of the socket wrench when a preset torque is reached. Pneumatic wrenches are commonly used in automobile service stations, where compressed air is available and the sparking of electric motors is a fire hazard.
Author: Wayne Scraba Wayne Scraba is a diehard car guy and regular contributor to OnAllCylinders. He’s owned his own speed shop, built race cars, street rods, and custom motorcycles, and restored muscle cars. He’s authored five how-to books and written over 4,500 tech articles that have appeared in sixty different high performance automotive, motorcycle and aviation magazines worldwide.
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This 2767 Gen 2 delivers the power and does it over and over, without a hiccup. Added features, such as the bolt removal mode, set apart the Milwaukee Gen 2 from the rest. Earning 97.6 points from a possible 100, this second generation high torque impact from Milwaukee beat 2nd by more than 11 points. The added LED worklight, shining from the battery area onto the work surface is a nice feature as well. At only $449 and a 5-year warranty, this also makes it the best value as well.

Finishing in the Runner-Up position (2nd place) is the Ingersoll Rand W7150. The fact that this is nearly a 5-year-old tool deserves huge props for fighting past these other great entrants. It finished a solid 2nd in power testing and 3rd in repetitive power (speed) testing. It’s the lightest tool of the bunch, weighing only 6.88 pounds, with the 5.0 Ah battery intact.


There are a lot of great wrench designs on the market, but in our opinion, one of the top designs would have to go to the Ingersoll Rand W7150. The Ingersoll design allows you to get the job done quickly and efficiently thanks to all of the great features that were built into the model. Additionally, it is powered by a powerful motor and is lightweight – perfect qualities for any worker who needs an impact wrench that can be mobile.
Over the past two decades we've tested hundreds of tools, but we never ran a competition this close. First, we tightened 38-inch and ¾-inch nuts with a torque wrench. Then we gathered seven cordless impact wrenches and removed the nuts. Somehow there wasn't a single tool with which we had a substantial complaint. We even tried it blindfolded, and could barely differentiate among our top performers. We chose our winner based on subjective measures: how it handled, balance, and grip. In terms of pure performance, though, the 41/2-star machines are just as good. Tools have come a long way in twenty years.
While the DeWALT tied for 2nd for features, it did suffer just a bit in the ergonomics category. With ergonomics being a more subjective testing category, users probably need to put the tool in their hand to make their own decision. If you have other DeWALT tools or you think you’re leaning to the DCF899, it’s easy to yes to this impact wrench. Furthermore, you can find the DeWALT stuff about anywhere tools are sold, making it easy for purchase.
It’s not all about power. While power and performance play into our formula, we also take into account value, ergonomics, features, and more. In the end, our charts, in-use photography, and videos should validate the objective results that determine the outcome. Okay, we know our audience, and we know what you want. We’ll keep from dilly-dallying any longer, and we’ll start with the knockout punch, right out of the gate.
Power. Yes, at the end of the day it’s all about that delicious power, baby! Let’s face it; if a regular wrench were enough for the job, you’d just use that. The fact that sometimes (often in fact) it’s a real struggle to loose some rusted on or tight bolts is the reason Impact Wrenches were invented. They put an incredible amount of power right into the palm of your hand.

Compressed air is the most common power source for impact wrenches, providing a low-cost design with the best power-to-weight ratio. A simple vane motor is almost always used, usually with four to seven vanes, and various lubrication systems, the most common of which uses oiled air, while others may include special oil passages routed to the parts that need it and a separate, sealed oil system for the hammer assembly. Most impact wrenches drive the hammer directly from the motor, giving it fast action when the fastener requires only low torque. Other designs use a gear reduction system before the hammer mechanism, most often a single-stage planetary gearset usually with a heavier hammer, delivering a more constant speed and higher "spin" torque. Electric impact wrenches are available, either mains powered, or for automotive use, 12-volt, 18-volt or 24-volt DC-powered. Recently, cordless electric impact wrenches have become common, although typically their power outputs are significantly lower than corded electric or air-powered equivalents. Some industrial tools are hydraulically powered, using high-speed hydraulic motors, and are used in some heavy equipment repair shops, large construction sites, and other areas where a suitable hydraulic supply is available. Hydraulic impact wrenches have the advantage of high power-to-weight ratio.
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