Shopping online for impact wrenches puts the largest selection at your disposal. The first consideration to make when shopping for an impact wrench is the size you need. An impact wrench can have just about any standard socket-wrench size, with models as small as 1/4 inch all the way to over 3 inches. Choose the size that you would most commonly use.
Our M12 FUEL™ 3/8" Stubby Impact Wrench is the industry's most compact cordless impact wrench. At only 4.8" in length, it allows you to work in tighter spaces delivering the power to complete many of the most demanding tasks and increasing your productivity. The compact impact delivers high torque with our POWERSTATE™ brushless motor. The impact wrench delivers an industry leading 250 ft.-lbs. of breakaway torque. This allows you to remove even the most stubborn bolts and fasteners. Our cordless impact wrench features built-in REDLIINK™ tool technology to help you get the job done. 4-Mode Drive Control provides you with unmatched control in various fastening applications Modes 1-3 gives you precision and control for any application. An Auto-Shut-Off Mode in the 4th setting prevents over-fastening of bolts while doing reassembly work. Our MILWAUKEE® M12 FUEL 3/8" Stubby Impact Wrench is part of the M12™ battery line, featuring over 90 powerful and compact tools.
Cordless impact wrenches come in two body styles: inline and pistol-grip. The inline style of impact wrench looks a lot like a large screwdriver, with a grip behind the hammer and anvil. The pistol style is shaped like a handgun, and the grip rests underneath the motor. Cordless impact wrenches also feature a selection of socket sizes designed to fit nuts and bolts of different sizes. The following table shows what socket sizes work with each impact wrench shape. Inline wrenches work best for jobs where you’re working in tight spaces and simply can’t fit a pistol-type impact wrench. If you plan to work on machinery, especially cars, then an inline impact wrench is a must-have tool.
If you really (Really) need brute force, look at this Air Cat Nitro Cat. It delivers an amazing 1,000 blows-per-minute delivering all the speed of a 1/2-inch drive tool with 3/4-inch drive power. They are engineered with the Extreme hard-hitting, twin-clutch mechanism. The housing is aramid-reinforced and it keeps the weight at only 4.7 pounds. By the way, it has a torque rating of (get this) 950 foot-pounds. (Image/Summit Racing)

Compressed air is the most common power source for impact wrenches, providing a low-cost design with the best power-to-weight ratio. A simple vane motor is almost always used, usually with four to seven vanes, and various lubrication systems, the most common of which uses oiled air, while others may include special oil passages routed to the parts that need it and a separate, sealed oil system for the hammer assembly. Most impact wrenches drive the hammer directly from the motor, giving it fast action when the fastener requires only low torque. Other designs use a gear reduction system before the hammer mechanism, most often a single-stage planetary gearset usually with a heavier hammer, delivering a more constant speed and higher "spin" torque. Electric impact wrenches are available, either mains powered, or for automotive use, 12-volt, 18-volt or 24-volt DC-powered. Recently, cordless electric impact wrenches have become common, although typically their power outputs are significantly lower than corded electric or air-powered equivalents. Some industrial tools are hydraulically powered, using high-speed hydraulic motors, and are used in some heavy equipment repair shops, large construction sites, and other areas where a suitable hydraulic supply is available. Hydraulic impact wrenches have the advantage of high power-to-weight ratio.

Summarizing a shootout always presents a problem. The real bottom line to this best cordless impact wrench shootout seems to hang solidly on power and performance. Milwaukee aimed to hit hard with the release of the 2767 high torque impact back in September. The results show their efforts seemed to have paid off. There’s been a ton of hype over this tool since the Milwaukee Tool NPS17 media event in Milwaukee, WI back in May. We had the privilege of getting our hands on the 2767 back then, and we couldn’t wait to bring it in the shop for testing.

Summarizing a shootout always presents a problem. The real bottom line to this best cordless impact wrench shootout seems to hang solidly on power and performance. Milwaukee aimed to hit hard with the release of the 2767 high torque impact back in September. The results show their efforts seemed to have paid off. There’s been a ton of hype over this tool since the Milwaukee Tool NPS17 media event in Milwaukee, WI back in May. We had the privilege of getting our hands on the 2767 back then, and we couldn’t wait to bring it in the shop for testing.

Over the past two decades we've tested hundreds of tools, but we never ran a competition this close. First, we tightened 38-inch and ¾-inch nuts with a torque wrench. Then we gathered seven cordless impact wrenches and removed the nuts. Somehow there wasn't a single tool with which we had a substantial complaint. We even tried it blindfolded, and could barely differentiate among our top performers. We chose our winner based on subjective measures: how it handled, balance, and grip. In terms of pure performance, though, the 41/2-star machines are just as good. Tools have come a long way in twenty years.
Our rig combines the front wheel of a car/truck with a weighted sled like those typically seen at tractor-pulls. Although our STR TorQ-O-Matic 5000 testing rig results may not provide a number you can brag about, it does a great job at providing work that levels the playing field on these high torque cordless impact wrenches. As the impact wrench turns the rotor, the weight moves further up the ramp, providing more clamping force on the rotor via the caliper.
In operation, a rotating mass is accelerated by the motor, storing energy, then suddenly connected to the output shaft (the anvil), creating a high-torque impact. The hammer mechanism is designed such that after delivering the impact, the hammer is again allowed to spin freely, and does not stay locked. With this design, the only reaction force applied to the body of the tool is the motor accelerating the hammer, and thus the operator feels very little torque, even though a very high peak torque is delivered to the socket. (This is similar to a conventional hammer, where the user applies a small, constant force to swing the hammer, which generates a very large impulse when the hammer strikes an object.) The hammer design requires a certain minimum torque before the hammer is allowed to spin separately from the anvil, causing the tool to stop hammering and instead smoothly drive the fastener if only low torque is needed, rapidly installing/removing the fastener.
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