Original NAPA sales receipt(s) or sales invoice(s) dated between 1/1/2016 and 3/31/2016. Photo copies will not be accepted (except for RI residents). It is recommended that you make a photo copy of all submitted materials for your records. Note: To resolve any potential questions or issues regarding your submission, you may be required to mail or fax these copies.
Our rig combines the front wheel of a car/truck with a weighted sled like those typically seen at tractor-pulls. Although our STR TorQ-O-Matic 5000 testing rig results may not provide a number you can brag about, it does a great job at providing work that levels the playing field on these high torque cordless impact wrenches. As the impact wrench turns the rotor, the weight moves further up the ramp, providing more clamping force on the rotor via the caliper.
Two wrenches, both nominal size ​5⁄8 in, with a diagram superimposed to show the logic that allows them both to be labeled the same when their actual sizes are clearly different (across-flats distance vs screw diameter). The larger wrench in this photo is from the 1920s or earlier; its face was polished to allow the size stamp to be visible in the photograph.
Sockets and extensions for impact wrenches are made of high tensile metal, as any spring effect will greatly reduce the torque available at the fastener. Even so, the use of multiple extensions, universal joints, and so forth will weaken the impacts, and the operator needs to minimize their use. Using non-impact sockets or accessories with an impact wrench will often result in bending, fracturing, or otherwise damaging the accessory, as most are not capable of withstanding the sudden high torque of an impact tool, and can result in stripping the head on the fastener. Non-impact sockets and accessories are made of a harder more brittle metal. Safety glasses should always be worn when working with impact tools, as the strong impacts can generate high-speed shrapnel if a socket, accessory, or fastener fails.
Keep in mind that all rechargeable batteries slowly lose their charge when not in use, but some batteries lose their charge much faster than others. The capacity of a battery used in a power tool is usually expressed as the amount of amperage hours (Ah) that it can deliver. “Ah” is different than the overall amperage rating of the tool. Here, Ah represents how much energy flow the battery can hold, not the level of current during operation. Keep in mind that a higher Ah means longer battery use between charges.
Strong compact lightweight and forceful this 20-Volt cordless Strong compact lightweight and forceful this 20-Volt cordless impact wrench fits into tight spaces and delivers a robust 1560 in. lbs. of maximum torque to power through tough fastening jobs on masonry metal and wood. Get huge savings with this package that includes two 20-Volt lithium-ion batteries (4Ah) charger and ...  More + Product Details Close
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