When it comes to the Makita XWT08, you can’t go wrong with this purchase. While it finished sixth with 78.7 points, only nine points separated 2nd to 6th. If you are Makita fan, then you’ll be proud to own the XWT08 as well. Power is ample, and it finished 2nd in real-world testing, with the repetitive power (speed) I-beam test, running off all 10 nuts in just 12.6 seconds.
The Milwaukee 2763 has very few notable faults. One issue is that the work light LED is just under the front of the impact. Commonly, users will use their other hand to brace the front of the impact, this will block the LED so it’s nearly useless. The 2763 delivers great power, and it did well in our speed test as well. Milwaukee sets itself apart with the 5-year warranty, and you can buy it online, your tool store, or in the big box stores.
Author: Wayne Scraba Wayne Scraba is a diehard car guy and regular contributor to OnAllCylinders. He’s owned his own speed shop, built race cars, street rods, and custom motorcycles, and restored muscle cars. He’s authored five how-to books and written over 4,500 tech articles that have appeared in sixty different high performance automotive, motorcycle and aviation magazines worldwide.

While the DeWALT tied for 2nd for features, it did suffer just a bit in the ergonomics category. With ergonomics being a more subjective testing category, users probably need to put the tool in their hand to make their own decision. If you have other DeWALT tools or you think you’re leaning to the DCF899, it’s easy to yes to this impact wrench. Furthermore, you can find the DeWALT stuff about anywhere tools are sold, making it easy for purchase.


And its steel lined casing will help to protect it from any workplace mishaps that could occur. Additionally, you’ll definitely appreciate the 780 ft-lbs of reverse torque that the machine is capable of generating, as well as the 1100 ft-lbs of nut busting power that it can produce. This product is truly innovative and produces amazing power, making it the highest quality on the market and sealing its place in our list as top choice

The Tradespro 837212 is a great device for anyone who needs to make an investment in a powerful tool on a limited budget. In fact, we consider it to be one of the best investments you could make. The device is fairly light weight which allows you to put in consistent work without tiring out too quickly or getting fatigued. You’ll love the comfortable grip as well which helps you to keep a steady hand on the device while you’re working. Additionally, the device can generate an impressive amount of torque and is on record for producing up to 240 ft-lbs of torque.


The M12 FUEL 1/4 in. Impact Wrench optimizes The M12 FUEL 1/4 in. Impact Wrench optimizes torque in tight spaces. This lightweight yet powerful impact wrench offers up to 3X longer motor life up to 2X more runtime and proprietary Milwaukee 2-Mode Drive control for better control over the power and speed required for specific applications. The Powerstate ...  More + Product Details Close
Torque Wrenches. A torque wrench allows you to apply a precise measure of force, or torque, to a bolt. Use these wrenches when you need to tighten bolts an exact amount, such as in engine repair. Some models have a scale that indicates the torque. Others create a clicking sound when the desired torque is reached. You can also find options with digital readouts for extra precision. 
The M12 FUEL 1/4 in. Impact Wrench optimizes The M12 FUEL 1/4 in. Impact Wrench optimizes torque in tight spaces. This lightweight yet powerful impact wrench offers up to 3X longer motor life up to 2X more runtime and proprietary Milwaukee 2-Mode Drive control for better control over the power and speed required for specific applications. The Powerstate ...  More + Product Details Close
Mobility. By going cordless, you are taking that power and adding a real degree of mobility to it. Yes, there are pros and cons to corded and cordless devices, and you must ensure you get the best battery (and perhaps a pair of them) to offset the biggest negative of cordless devices. Still, the biggest plus is mobility and not having to worry about being tethered to a power outlet.

When it comes to the Makita XWT08, you can’t go wrong with this purchase. While it finished sixth with 78.7 points, only nine points separated 2nd to 6th. If you are Makita fan, then you’ll be proud to own the XWT08 as well. Power is ample, and it finished 2nd in real-world testing, with the repetitive power (speed) I-beam test, running off all 10 nuts in just 12.6 seconds.


Finishing in the Runner-Up position (2nd place) is the Ingersoll Rand W7150. The fact that this is nearly a 5-year-old tool deserves huge props for fighting past these other great entrants. It finished a solid 2nd in power testing and 3rd in repetitive power (speed) testing. It’s the lightest tool of the bunch, weighing only 6.88 pounds, with the 5.0 Ah battery intact.
Grip – Impact wrenches can actually come in a few shapes and sizes, but in this guide we’ve concentrated on models that – if you squint – look like standard power drills. We’ve done this as most cordless style impact wrenches are of this type. They are also simple to use. Because of their shape they do need a good grip, so make sure you bear that in mind. A good grip should be ergonomic, so it’s comfortable to hold, with good trigger placement and a raised or rubberized surface so you can orient the tool in your hand by touch only.
Keep in mind that all rechargeable batteries slowly lose their charge when not in use, but some batteries lose their charge much faster than others. The capacity of a battery used in a power tool is usually expressed as the amount of amperage hours (Ah) that it can deliver. “Ah” is different than the overall amperage rating of the tool. Here, Ah represents how much energy flow the battery can hold, not the level of current during operation. Keep in mind that a higher Ah means longer battery use between charges.
Adjustable Wrenches. These tools have one stationary jaw and one adjustable jaw that can fit a variety of different nut sizes. When you use an adjustable wrench, make sure you’re turning the tool toward the adjustable side, putting pressure on the stationary jaw. This will prevent you from stripping or rounding your fastener. These wrenches are a great choice for any toolbox because you’ll always have the wrench size you need. 
Old English wrencan "to twist," from Proto-Germanic *wrankijanan (cf. Old High German renken, German renken "to twist, wrench," Old English wringan "to wring"), from PIE *wreng- "to turn" (cf. Sanskrit vrnakti "turns, twists," Lithuanian rengtis "to grow crooked, to writhe"), nasalized variant of *werg- "to turn" (cf. Latin vergere "to turn, tend toward"), from root *wer- (3) "to turn, bend" (see versus). Related: Wrenched, wrenching.

Remember when we stated there was an exception to the big air power torque? This is it: Ingersoll Rand’s 1/2-inch drive W7150K2 packs a whollop. It has a maximum output rating of 780 foot-pounds and it’s powered by a 20-volt Lithium Ion battery. Part of the secret to it’s big power is the rare earth magnet motor. This isn’t an inexpensive impact wrench, but the kit includes two batteries along with a charger.

When compared to many other power tools, cordless impact wrenches are quite specialized in what they do. Large nuts and bolts may not need to be removed or tightened as often as smaller screws. But when you do need to adjust one, a cordless impact wrench will save you both time and energy. They can also loosen and tighten nuts and bolts much more accurately than hand tools such as sockets and ratchets, which is critical when it comes to working with larger bolts or on machinery.
As one of the few subjective areas of our testing, we do our best to still quantify our results by including many users and data logging the results. Even though cordless tools are getting a bit smaller and lighter, due to technology, the cordless impact wrenches still have some weight and girth. Using a heavy tool can be a real pain, so it makes sense to place value on the fit and comfort of such a tool. More than just weight, balance, and vibration also play into our testing.

The Milwaukee 2763 has very few notable faults. One issue is that the work light LED is just under the front of the impact. Commonly, users will use their other hand to brace the front of the impact, this will block the LED so it’s nearly useless. The 2763 delivers great power, and it did well in our speed test as well. Milwaukee sets itself apart with the 5-year warranty, and you can buy it online, your tool store, or in the big box stores.
Impact wrenches are available in all sizes and in several styles, depending on the application. ¼" drive wrenches are commonly available in both inline (the user holds the tool like a screwdriver, with the output on the end) and pistol grip (the user holds a handle which is at right angles to the output) forms, and less commonly in an angle drive, which is similar to an inline tool but with a set of bevel gears to rotate the output 90°. ⅜" impacts are most commonly available in pistol grip form and a special inline form known as a "butterfly" wrench, which has a large, flat throttle paddle on the side of the tool which may be tilted to one side or the other to control the direction of rotation, rather than using a separate reversing control, and shaped to allow access into tight areas. Regular inline and angle ⅜" drive impact wrenches are uncommon, but available. ½" drive units are virtually only available in pistol grip form, with any inline type being virtually impossible to obtain, due to the increased torque transmitted back to the user and the greater weight of the tool requiring the larger handle. ¾" drive impact wrenches are again essentially only available in pistol grip form. 1" drive tools are available in both pistol grip and "D handle" inline, where the back of the tool has an enclosed handle for the user to hold. Both forms often also incorporate a side handle, allowing both hands to hold the tool at once. 1¼" and larger wrenches are usually available in "T handle" form, with two large handles on either side of the tool body, allowing for maximum torque to be applied to the user, and giving the best control of the tool. Very large impact wrenches (up to several hundred thousand foot-pounds of torque) usually incorporate eyelets in their design, allowing them to be suspended from a crane, lift, or other device, since their weight is often more than a person can move. A recent design combines an impact wrench and an air ratchet, often called a "reactionless air ratchet" by the manufacturers, incorporating an impact assembly before the ratchet assembly. Such a design allows very high output torques with minimal effort on the operator, and prevents the common injury of slamming one's knuckles into some part of the equipment when the fastener tightens down and the torque suddenly increases. Specialty designs are available for certain applications, such as removing crankshaft pulleys without removing the radiator in a vehicle.
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